“How to Disappear Completely”: A Deeply Personal Story that Shines a Light on Tech. Theatre

Itai Erdal’s How to Disappear Completely is completely non-fiction: partly a memoir on the deterioration of his mother’s condition after her cancer diagnosis, the show fascinatingly is also something of an intro to theatrical lighting design. Erdal keeps the connection understated between these two halves, so while at times the show seems to ramble, most … Continue reading “How to Disappear Completely”: A Deeply Personal Story that Shines a Light on Tech. Theatre

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“The Twilight Parade”: Looks Cool, but Comes On a Little Strong

IAN: STO Union’s The Twilight Parade is a genuinely impressive undertaking: a 70-minute hand-animated film entirely put together by local community members, while 8 voice actors provide live voiceover. This family-friendly (for the most part) show follows a young fairy-like creature and the residents of a small town as they address the lack of love … Continue reading “The Twilight Parade”: Looks Cool, but Comes On a Little Strong

“Indigenous Walks” Sets a New Pace for Canadian Art History

Admittedly I was not super looking forward to a walking tour in this frigid hell we call the Capital City; however, Indigenous Walks marks an almost necessary experience for any individual in Ottawa- local or otherwise. Taking us around the Byward Market, our guide (re)introduced us to many Indigenous artworks seemingly hidden in the area … Continue reading “Indigenous Walks” Sets a New Pace for Canadian Art History

“The Pipeline Project” Strikes Gold

  Ian: The Pipeline Project has a lot going for it: it’s well-written and -performed, it deals with issues that directly affect Canadians, and with Kevin Loring’s involvement it also serves as something of a teaser for the upcoming Indigenous Theatre stream at the National Arts Centre. What strikes me the most about this production, however, … Continue reading “The Pipeline Project” Strikes Gold

“Little Boxes” Has Giant Stage Presence

Ian: I have to say my first night at undercurrents 2018 really blew me away, with two mainstage shows that examine major issues bubbling under the surface of Canadian society and a workshop production that’s already taking its unusual premise in fun directions. The first show of the night was Little Boxes, an exploration of … Continue reading “Little Boxes” Has Giant Stage Presence

Moscovitch’s 1920s Drama Falls Short in 2018

“Girls have been written and represented in popular culture in many different ways. Most of these representations have been largely unsatisfying because they never get girlhood quite right. It is not possible for girlhood to be represented wholly—girlhood is too vast and too individual an experience. We can only try to represent girlhood in ways … Continue reading Moscovitch’s 1920s Drama Falls Short in 2018

Shakespeare’s Twelfth Night at Sock’N’Buskin: A Review

by Ron Finnigan   Twelfth Night, which is currently being presented at Carleton’s Kailesh Mital Theatre by Sock’N’Buskin on January 18th-20th and 25th- 27th, is a more traditional, albeit edited, staging of Shakespeare’s famous play. In the director’s notes included in the program, Tamara LaPlante comments that she's “never laughed so much” in rehearsing the … Continue reading Shakespeare’s Twelfth Night at Sock’N’Buskin: A Review

Student Production Sees Success With ‘Legally Blonde’

The University of Ottawa’s Musical Theatre Society has just served up what might be the most fun production of January. If you missed this sold out show, I can understand your feelings of FOMO. It’s been just over a week and I’m still thinking about this production. Legally Blonde: The Musical (book by Heather Hach … Continue reading Student Production Sees Success With ‘Legally Blonde’